High Temp Metals 800-500-2141

HAYNES 242 TECHNICAL DATA


Type Analysis | Principal Features | Stress Rupture Strength | Tensile Properties | Thermal Expansion Properties
Low Cycle Fatigue Properties | High Temperature Hardness Properties | Thermal Stability | Typical Physical Properties | Oxidation Resistance
Workability

Type Analysis

Element

Min

Max

Carbon

--

0.03

Manganese

--

0.80

Silicon

--

0.80

Chromium

7.00

9.00

Iron

--

2.00

Aluminum

--

0.50

Boron

--

0.006

Copper

--

0.50

Molybdenum

24.00

26.00

Cobalt

--

2.50

Nickel

BAL


Principal Features

Excellent High-Temperature Strength, Low Thermal Expansion Characteristics, and Good Oxidation Resistance.
Haynes alloy 242 is an age-hardenable nickel-molybdenum-chromium alloy which derives its strength from a long-range-ordering reaction upon aging. It has tensile and creep strength properties up to 1300°F (705°C) which are as much as double those for solid solution strengthened alloys, but with high ductivity in the aged condition. The thermal characteristics of 242 alloy are much lower than those for most other alloys, and it has very good oxidation resistance up to 1500°F(815°C). Other attractive features include excellent low cycle fatigue properties, very good th ermal stability, and resistance to high-temperature fluorine and fluoride environments.

Fabrication
Haynes alloy 242 has very good forming and welding characteristics in the annealed condition. It may be forged or otherwise hot-worked by conventional techniques, and it is readily cold formable. Welding may be performed in the annealed condition by standard gas tungsten arec (GTAW) or ga metal arc (GMAW) techniques. Use of matching compostion filler metal is suggested. For further information on forming and fabrication, contact Haynes International.

Heat-Treatment
Haynes alloy 242 is furnished in the annealed condition, unless otherwise specified. The alloy is usually annealed in the range of 1900-2050°F (925-1120°C),depending upon specific requirements, followed by an air cool (or more rapid cooling) before aging. A water quench is recommended for heavy section components..
Aging is performed at 1200°F (650°C) for a period of 24 hours, followed by an air cool.

Available in Convenient Forms
Haynes alloy 242 is produced in the form of reforge billet, bar, plate, sheet, and wire welding products. all in various sizes. Other forms may be produced upon request.

Applications
Haynes alloy 242 combines properties which make it ideally suited for a variety of component applications in the aerospace industry. It will be used for seal rings, containment rings, rocket nozzles, pumps, and many others. In the chemical process industry, 242 alloy will find use in high-temperature hydrofluoric acid vapor-containing processes as a consequese of its excellent resistance to high-temperature fluoride salt mixtures.
The high strength and fluorins environment-resistance of 242 alloy has also been shown to provide for excellent service in fluoroelastomer process equipment, such as extrusion screws.


Stress-Rupture Strength

Haynes alloy 242 is an age-hardenable material which combines excellent strength and ductility in the aged condition with good fabricalility in the annealed condition. It is particularly effective for strength-limited applications up to 1300°F (750°C), where its strength is as much as double that for typical solid-solution strengthened alloys. It may be used at highter temperatures, where its solid-solution strength is still excellent, but oxidation resistance limits such uses to about 1500-1600°F (815-870°C)

Bar and Ring - Annealed and Aged*

Test Temperature
°F (°C)

Approximate Initial Stress, Ksi (MPa)
Required to Cause Rupture in Specified Time

10 Hours

100 Hours

1,000 Hours

1000 (540)
1100 (595)
1200 (650)
1300 (705)
1400 (760)
1500 (815)
1600 (870)




------------------------ Data Being Developed ------------------------

Hot-Rolled Plate - Annealed and Aged*

Test Temperature
°F (°C)

Approximate Initial Stress, Ksi (MPa)
Required to Cause Rupture in Specified Time

10 Hours

100 Hours

1,000 Hours

1000 (540)

160 (1105)

140 (965)

120 (825)

1100 (595)

130 (895)

110 (760)

93 (640)

1200 (650)

105 (725)

90 (620)

75 (515)

1300 (705)

86 (595)

69 (475)

35 (240)

1400 (760)

62 (425)

29 (200)

17 (115)

1500 (815)

26 (180)

16 (110)

11 (76)

1600 (870)

15 (105)

11 (74)

---

Cold-Rolled Sheet - Annealed and Aged*

Test Temperature
°F (°C)

Approximate Initial Stress, Ksi (MPa)
Required to Cause Rupture in Specified Time

10 Hours

100 Hours

1,000 Hours

1000 (540)
1100 (595)
1200 (650)
1300 (705)
1400 (760)



------------------------ Data Being Developed ------------------------

*Extracted from Larson-Miller plots of limited data


Tensile Properties

Bar and Rings - Annealed and Aged

Test Temperature
°F (°C)

Ultimate Tensile Strength
Ksi (MPa)

Yield Strength at 0.2% Offset
Ksi (MPa)

Elongation in 4D
%

Reduction in 4D
%

Room
200 (95)
400 (205)
600 (315)
800 (425)
1000 (540)
1200 (650)
1400 (760)
1600 (870)
1800 (980)

187.4 (1290)
180.7 (1245)
173.5 (1195)
168.6 (1160)
161.3 (1110)
156.3 (1080)
144.9 (1000)
106.2 (730)
72.5 (500)
42.0 (290)

122.4 (845)
110.4 (760)
102.3 (705)
96.5 (665)
86.3 (595)
78.3 (540)
82.7 (570)
44.9 (310)
44.8 (310)
30.6 (210)

33.7
31.7
33.0
33.4
37.6
38.3
33.2
44.3
49.7
54.0

45.7
47.0
51.8
48.4
45.9
49.9
41.1
54.1
85.1
97.8

Hot-Rolled Plate - Annealed and Aged

Test Temperature
°F (°C)

Ultimate Tensile Strength
Ksi (MPa)

Yield Strength at 0.2% Offset
Ksi (MPa)

Elongation in 4D
%

Reduction in 4D
%

Room
200 (95)
400 (205)
600 (315)
800 (425)
1000 (540)
1200 (650)
1300 (705)
1400 (760)
1600 (870)
1800 (980)

184 (1270)
174 (1195)
161 (1110)
156 (1075)
154 (1060)
145 (1000)
137 (945)
117 (805)
106 (730)
69 (480)
41 (280)

113 (780)
106 (725)
91 (630)
87 (600)
80 (555)
70 (480)
76 (525)
65 (450)
42 (290)
40 (275)
28 (190)

38.1
39.8
42.3
42.7
44.0
46.6
37.7
30.9
66.3
56.1
65.1

46.6
48.1
43.1
41.5
39.7
41.4
41.8
30.4
45.0
46.9
86.0

Cold-Rolled Sheet - Annealed and Aged

Test Temperature
°F (°C)

Ultimate Tensile Strength
Ksi (MPa)

Yield Strength at 0.2% Offset
Ksi (MPa)

Elongation in 4D
%

Room
200 (95)
400 (205)
600 (315)
800 (425)
1000 (540)
1200 (650)
1300 (705)
1400 (760)
1600 (870)
1800 (980)

198 (1365)
195 (1345)
188 (1295)
183 (1260)
176 (1215)
169 (1165)
152 (1045)
125 (860)
110 (760)
65 (445)
33 (225)

135 (930)
138 (950)
130 (900)
124 (855)
117 (810)
115 (790)
99 (680)
91 (625)
65 (450)
39 (265)
15 (100)

31.8
29.2
29.4
36.4
33.2
30.9
20.4
15.7
44.5
32.9
32.1

Cold-Reduced Sheet - As Cold-Worked and Cold-Worked plus Aged

Condition*

Test Temperature
°F (°C)

Ultimate Tensile Strength
Ksi (MPa)

Yield Strength at 0.2% Offset
Ksi (MPa)

Elongation in 4D
%

M.A.
M.A. + 20% C.W.
M.A. + 40% C.W.
M.A. + Age
M.A. + 20% C.W. + Age
M.A. + 40% C.W. + Age
M.A. + 40% C.W. + Age
M.A. + 40% C.W. + Age
M.A. + 40% C.W. + Age
M.A. + 40% C.W. + Age

Room
Room
Room
Room
Room
Room
1100 (595)
1200 (650)
1300 (705)
1400 (760)

137.6 (950)
169.6 (1170)
217.9 (1500)
192.0 (1325)
209.5 (1445)
244.7 (1685)
201.9 (1390)
198.7 (1370)
183.7 (1265)
156.0 (1075)

65.3 (450)
139.5 (960)
181.3 (1250)
130. (895)
173.0 (1195)
219.7 (1515)
191.4 (1320)
145.9 (1005)
134.3 (925)
94.1 (650)

47
20
8
32
21
11
11
8
11
32

*M.A. = Mill Annealed; C.W. = Cold Work; Age = Standard Aging Treatment.


Comparison of Thermal Expansion Characteristics

Haynes alloy 242 exhibits significantly lower thermal expansion characteristics than most nickel-base high-temperature alloys in the range of temperature to 1600°F (870°C). Although its expansion is greater than that for alloy 909 below 1000°F (540°C), at higher temperatures, the difference narrows considerably.

Mean Coefficient of Thermal Expansion

The following compares the mean coefficient of expansion for several alloys.

Test Temperature
°F (°C)

Mean Coefficient of Expansion
From RT to Temperature, in/in.-°F (mm/mm-°C) x 10(-6)

1000°F (540°C)

1100°F (595°C)

1200°F (650°C)

1300°F (705°C)

1400°F (760°C)

Alloy 909
242 Alloy
Alloy B
Alloy N
Alloy S
Alloy X

5.0 (9.0)
6.8 (12.2)
6.7 (12.0)
7.3 (13.1)
7.4 (13.2)
8.4(15.1)

5.4 (9.7)
6.8 (12.3)
6.7 (12.0)
7.4 (13.3)
7.5 (13.5)
8.5 (15.3)

5.8 (10.4)
7.0 (12.6)
6.7 (12.0)
7.5 (13.5)
7.6 (13.7)
8.6 (15.5)

6.2 (11.2)
7.2 (13.0)
6.9 (12.4)
7.6 (13.7)
7.8 (14.0)
8.7 (15.7)

6.6 (11.9)
7.7 (13.9)
7.1 (12.8)
7.8 (14.0)
8.0 (14.4)
8.8 (15.8)


Low Cycle Fatigue Properties

Haynes alloy 242 has very good low cycle fatigue resistance, particularly in comparison to solid-solution-strengthened alloys. Results for stress-controlled tests are given below.

Stress-Controlled LCF Properties (Hot-Rolled Rings)

The following test results were generated from hot-rolled and fully heat-treated rings destined for actual gas turbine engine part applications. Testing was performed in the tangential direction utilizing a round test bar geometry with a double notch design (K(t)=2.18.). Loading was uniaxial, with a stress reversal factor R= 0.05, and a cycle frequency of 20 cpm (0.33 Hz).

Maximum Stress

Cycle to Failure at 1200°F (650°C), N(f)

Ksi (Mpa)

242 alloy

Alloy 909

110 (760)
100 (690)
95 (655)
90 (620)
85 (585)
80 (550)

845
12,220
32,587
76,763
297,848
304,116*

2,835
22,568
13,796
59,679; 40,525
47,707; 43,701
129,753**

* No crack observed at 198,030 cycles. 8 mil (200um) crack observed at 200,000 cycles.
** No crack observed at 45,800. 8 mil (200um) crack observed at 47,770 cycles.


High-Temperature Hardness Properties

The following are results from standard vacuum furnace hot hardness tests. Value are given in originally measured DPH (Vickers) units and conversions to Rockwell C/B scale in parentheses.

Material

Vickers Diamond Pyramid Hardness (Rockwell C/B Hardness)

800°F (425°C)

1000°F (540°C)

1200°F (650°C)

1400°F (760°C)

1600°F (870°C)

242 alloy
Alloy 6B
Alloy 25
Alloy 188
230 alloy
556 alloy

271 (Rc 26)
269 (Rc 26)
171 (Rb 87)
170 (Rb 86)
142 (Rb 77)
132 (Rb 73)

263 (Rc 24)
247 (Rc 22)
160 (Rb 83)
159 (Rb 83)
139 (Rb 76)
129 (Rb 72)

218 (Rb 95)
225 (Rb 98)
150 (Rb 80)
147 (Rb 77)
132 (Rb 73)
118 (Rb 67)

140 (Rb 75)
153 (Rb 81)
134 (Rb 74)
129 (Rb 72)
125 (Rb 70)
100 (Rb 55)

78
91
93
89
75
67


Thermal Stability

Haynes alloy 242 has excellent retained ductility and impact strength after long-term thermal exposure at temperature. Combined with its high strength and low thermal expansion characteristics, this makes for very good containment properties in gas turbine static structures. The graphs below show the retained room-temperature tensile elongation and impact strength for 242 alloy versus other relevent materials after a 4000 hour exposure at 1200°F (650°C).

Room-Temperature Properties After Exposure at 1200°F (650°C)*

Exposure Time Hours

Ultimate
Tensile Strength

0.2% Yield
Strength

Elongation
in 2 in. (50mm)

Reduction
in Area

Charpy
V-Notch

Ksi (MPa)

Ksi (MPa)

%

%

Ft.-lbs.

Joules

0
1000
4000
8000

179 (1235)
194 (1340)
196 (1350)
193 (1330)

110 (760)
119 (820)
122 (840)
121 (835)

39
28
25
24

44
38
37
39

66
41
31
26

90
56
42
35

* Samples machined from plate after exposure. Duplicate tests.


Typical Physical Properties

Temperature, °F

British Units

Temperature, °C

Metric Units

Density

Room

0.327 lb/cubic in

Room

9.05 g/cubic cm

Melting Range

2350-2510

1290-1375

Electrical Resistivity

Room
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
--

48.0 Mu.ohm-in.
48.5
49.3
50.0
50.6
51.1
51.7
52.4
51.3
50.4
--

Room
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000

122.0 Mu.ohm-in.
123.4
125.1
126.7
128.0
129.5
130.6
132.0
132.4
129.8
127.6

Thermal Diffusivity

Room
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
--

4.7 x 10(-3) in²/sec.
5.1
5.6
6.1
6.6
7.2
7.9
7.2
7.0
7.6
--

Room
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000

30.5 x 10(-3) cm²/sec.
32.9
35.9
39.0
41.9
45.0
48.1
51.2
44.2
46.6
49.6

Thermal Conductivity

Room
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
--

75.7 BTU-in./ft² hr.-°F
83.6
96.1
108.5
120.9
133.3
145.7
158.2
170.6
183.0
--

Room
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000

11.3 W/m-K
12.6
14.2
15.9
17.5
19.2
20.9
22.5
24.2
25.8
27.5

Specific Heat

Room
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
--

0.092 Btu/lb.-°F
0.097
0.100
0.103
0.106
0.110
0.118
0.144
0.146
0.150
--

Room
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000

386 J/Kg-K
405
419
431
439
451
470
595
605
610
627

Mean Coefficient of
Thermal Expansion

70-200
70-400
70-600
70-800
70-1000
70-1100
70-1200
70-1300
70-1400
70-1600
70-1800
--

6.0 microin/in.-°F
6.3
6.5
6.7
6.8
6.8
6.9
7.2
7.7
8.0
8.3
--

25-100
25-200
25-300
25-400
25-500
25-600
25-650
25-700
25-750
25-800
25-900
25-1000

10.8 Mu.m/m-°C
11.3
11.6
11.9
12.2
12.3
12.4
13.0
13.7
14.0
14.5
15.0

Dynamic Modulus of Elasticity

Temperature, °F

Dynamic Modulus of
Elasticity, 10(6) psi

Temperature, °C

Dynamic Modulus of
Elasticity, GPa

Room
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
--

33.2
32.7
31.8
30.8
29.7
28.6
27.6
25.7
24.0
22.4
--

Room
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000

229
225
219
213
206
199
193
185
172
163
152


Oxidation Resistance

Haynes alloy 242 exhibits very good oxidation resistance at temperature up to 1500°F (815°C), and should not require protective coating for continuous or intermittent service at these temperatures. The alloy is not specifically designed for use at highter temperatures, but can tolerate short-term exposures.

Comparative Burner Rig Oxidation-Resistance at 1400°F (760°C) for 500 Hours.

Alloy

Metal Loss

Average Metal Affected

Maximum Metal Affected

Mils

Mu.m

Mils

Mu.m

Mils

Mu.m

HASTELLOY Alloy N
242 alloy
HASTELLOY alloy B
Alloy 909

0.7
1.1
1.8
0.3

18
28
46
8

0.8
1.2
2.6
10.8

20
30
66
275

1.2
1.6
2.8
12.8

30
41
71
325

Oxidation Test Parameters

Burner rig oxidation tests were conducted by exposing samples 3/8 inch x 2.5 inches x thickness (9mm x 64mm x thickness), in a rotating holder, to the products of combustion of No. 2 fuel oil burned at a ratio of air to fuel of about 50:1 (Gas velocity was about 0.3 mach). Samples were automatically removed from the gas stream every 30 minutes and fan-cooled to near ambient temperature and then reinsured into the flame tunnel.

Comparative Oxidation-Resistance in Flowing Air At 1500°F (815°C) For 1008 Hours*

Alloy

Metal Loss

Average Metal Affected

Mils

Mu.m

Mils

Mu.m

242 alloy
HASTELLOY alloy S
HASTELLOY alloy X
HASTELLOY alloy N
HASTELLOY alloy B
Alloy 909

0.0
0.0
0.1
0.4
7.2
4.4

0
0
3
10
183
112

0.5
0.5
1.1
1.2
8.2
19.4

13
13
28
30
208
493

* Coupons exposed to flowing air at a velocity of 7.0 feet/minute (2.1m/minute) past the samples. Samples cycled to room temperature once-a-day.


Resistance To High-Temperature Fluoride Environments

Research has shown that materials which have high molybdenum content and low chromium content are generally superior to other materials in resisting high-temperature corrosion in fluorine-containing environments. Haynes alloy 242 is in that catergory, and displays excellent resistance to both fluoride gas and fluoride salt environments.

Comparative Resistance to 70% HF At 1670°F (910°C) For 136 Hours

Alloy

Thickness Loss

Mils

mm

242 alloy
HASTELLOY alloy S
HASTELLOY alloy N
Alloy 625
230 alloy
C-22 alloy
Alloy 600

12.6
15.8
15.8
47.2
70.9
78.7
141.7

0.3
0.4
0.4
1.2
1.8
2.0
3.6


Resistance To Nitriding

Haynes alloy 242 has very good resistance to nitriding environments. Tests were performed in flowing ammonia at 1800°F (980°C) for 168 hours. Nitrogen absorption was determined by chemical analysis before and after exposure and knowledge of the specimen area.

Alloy

Nitrogen Absorption

(mg/cm²)

HAYNES alloy 214
HAYNES alloy 242
Alloy 600
HAYNES alloy 230
HASTELLOY alloy X
Alloy 800H
Type 316 Stainless Steel
Type 304 Stainless Steel
Type 310 Stainless Steel

0.3
0.7
0.9
1.4
3.2
4.0
6.0
7.3
7.7


Resistance To Salt-Spray Corrosion

Haynes alloy 242 exhibits good resistance to corrosion by sodium-sulfate-containing sea water environment at 1200°F (650°C). Tests were performed by heating specimens to 300°F (150°C), spraying with a simulated sea water solution, cooling and storing at room temperature for a week, heating to 1200°F (650°C) for 20 hours in still air; cooling to room temperature, heating and spraying again at 300°F (150°C), and storing at room temperature for a week.

Alloy

Metal Loss

Maximum Metal
Affected

Mils

Mu.m

Mils

Mu.m

HASTELLOY alloy S
HAYNES alloy 242
HAYNES alloy B
Alloy 909

0.10
0.15
0.20
0.40

2.5
3.8
5.1
10.2

0.20
0.30
0.30
1.20

5.1
7.6
5.6
30.5


Resistance To Hydrogen Embrittlement

Notched room-temperature tensile tests performed in hydrogen and air reveal that 242 alloy is roughly equivalent to alloy 625 in resisting hydrogen embrittlement, and appears to be superior to many important materials. Tests were performed in MIL-P27201B grade hydrogen, with a crosshead speed of 0.005 in./min. (0.13 mm/min.).

Alloy

Hydrogen Pressure

Kt

Ratio of Notched
Tensile Strength
Hydrogen/Air

Psi

MPa

WASPALOY alloy
Alloy 625
242 alloy
Alloy 718
Alloy R-41
Alloy X-750

7,000
5,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
7,000

48
34
34
69
69
48

6.3
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
6.3

.78
.76
.74
.46
.27
.26


Aqueous Corrosion Resistance

Although not specifically designed for use in applications which require resistance to aqueous corrosion, 242 alloy does exhibit resistance in some media wich compares favorably with that exhibited by traditional corrosion-resistance alloys. Data shown for 242 alloy was generated for samples tested in the mill annealed condition.

Corrosive
Media

Temperature
°F (°C)

Exposure
Hours

Corrosion Rate, Mils/year (mm/year)

242 alloy

alloy B-2

C-22 alloy

alloy N

5% HF
48% HF
70% HF
10% HCl
20% HCl
55% H3PO4
85% H3PO4
10% H3PO4
50% H3PO4
99% ACETIC

175 (79)
175 (79)
125 (52)
Boiling
Boiling
Boiling
Boiling
Boiling
Boiling
Boiling

24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
24

14 (0.36)
32 (0.81)
35 (0.89)
22 (.056)
41 (1.04)
3 (0.08)
4 (0.10)
2 (0.05)
5 (0.13)
<1 (<0.03)

12 (0.30)
25 (0.64)
66 (1.68)
7 (0.18)
15 (0.38)
4 (0.10)
4 (0.10)
2 (0.05)
1 (0.03)
1 (0.03)

25 (0.64)
27 (0.69)
32 (0.81)
400 (10.16)
380 (9.65)
9 (0.23)
120 (3.05)
11 (0.28)
390 (9.91)
Nil

20 (0.51)
31 (0.79)
48 (1.22)
204 (5.18)
---
---
---
46 (1.17)
---
---


Fabrication and Welding

Haynes alloy 242 has excellent forming and welding characteristics. It may be hot-worked at temperatures in the range of about 1800-2250°F (980-1230°C) provided the entire piece is soaked for a time sufficient to bring it uniformly to temperature. Initial breakdown is normally performed at the higher end of the range, while finishing is usually done at the lower temperatures to afford grain refinement.
As a consequence of its good ductility, 242 alloy is also readily formed by cold-working. All hot- or cold-worked parts should be annealed at 1900-2050°F (925-1120°C) and cooled by air cool or faster rate before aging at 1200°F (650°C) in order to develop the best balance of properties.
The alloy can be welded by a variety of processes, including gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, and shielded metal arc. High heat input processes such as submerged arc and oxyacetalyne welding are not recommended.
Welding Procedures
Welding procedures common to most high-temperature, nickel-base alloys are recommended. These include use of stringer beads and an interpass temperature less than 200°F (95°C). Preheat is not required. Cleanliness is critical, and careful attention should be given to the removal of grease, oil, crayon marks, shop dirt, ect. prior to welding. Because of the alloy's high nickel content, the weld puddle will be somewhat "sluggish" relavive to steels. To avoid lack of fusion and incomplete penetration defects, the root opening and bevel should be sufficiently open.
Filler Metals
Haynes alloy 242 should be joined using matching filler metal. If shielded metal arc welding is used, HASTELLOY alloy W coated electrodes are suggested.
Post-Welded Heat Treatment
HAYNES alloy 242 is normally used in the fully-aged condition. However, following forming and welding, a full solution anneal is recommended prior to aging in order to develop the best joint and overall fabrication properties.


Health and Safety Information

Welding can be a safe occupation. Those in the welding industry, however, should be aware of the potential hazards associated with welding fumes, gases, radiation, electric shock, heat, eye injuries, burns, etc. Also, local, municipal, state, and federal regulations (such as those issued by OSHA) relative to welding and cutting processes should be considered.
Nickel-, cobalt-, and iron-base alloy products may contain, in varying concentrations, the following elemental constituents: aluminum, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenium ,nickel and tungsten. For specific concentrations of these and other elements present, refer to the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) H3095 and H1072 for the product.
Inhalation of metal dust or fumes generated form welding, cutting, grinding, melting, or dross handling of these alloys may cuase adverse health effects such as reduced lung function, nasal and mucous membrane irritation. Exposure to dust or fumes which may be generated in working with these alloys may also cause eye irritation, skin rash and effects on other organ systems.
The operation and maintenance of welding and cutting equipment should conform to the provisions of American National Standard ANSI/AWS Z49.1, "Safety in Welding and Cutting". Attention is especially called to Section 7 (Protection of Personnel) and 8 (Health Protection and Ventilation) of ANSI/AWS Z49.1. Mechanical ventilation is advisable and under certain conditions such as a very confined space, is necessary during welding or cutting operations, or both, to prevent possible exposure to hazardous fumes, gases, or dust that may occur.


Machine Guidelines

HAYNES alloy 242 may be machined in either the solution-annealed or aged conditions. Carbide tools are recommended. In the annealed condition (Rb 95-100 typical hardness) the alloy is somewhat "gummy". Better result may be achiedved by performing machining operations on material in the age-hardened condition (Rc 35-39 typical hardness). Finish turning has been successfully done employing carbide tools with a depth of cut in the range of 0.010-0.020 inch (0.25-0.50 mm), rotation speeds of 200-400 rpm, 40-80 sfm, and a water-base lubricant.

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